Entertainment

Padmavati: Censor Board seeks help from royal family for certification

23 Dec 2017 | By Sneha Bengani
Padmavati: Prasoon Joshi calls Mewar's royal family

The Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) has invited Mewar royal family to assist it in certifying Sanjay Leela Bhansali's controversial period drama 'Padmavati'.

CBFC chair Prasoon Joshi, called the royal family's Vishvaraj Singh requesting help, reported Hindustan Times.

However, Singh has requested certain clarifications from the Board before giving any response.

Read on for more.

In context: Padmavati: Prasoon Joshi calls Mewar's royal family

23 Dec 2017Padmavati: Censor Board seeks help from royal family for certification

DetailsWhat does Vishvaraj Singh want?

Singh wants clarity on whether Padmavati is seeking certification as a fantasy or a historical drama. He also wants to know if the panel's findings would be advisory or binding.

He's miffed that such a big film was made about his ancestors without ever informing/consulting the royal family. Since Padmavati uses historical people and events, he says the story and characters demand responsible depiction.

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Vishvaraj Singh had previously tried to contact CBFC

After seeing the film's songs, trailers and promos, Singh says he had emailed Prasoon Joshi twice, on November 11 and December 1, intending to raise objections. However, he never got a response from Joshi or anyone else from the CBFC.
Padmavati won't release before March-April 2018

DelaysPadmavati won't release before March-April 2018

In another development, Hindustan Times reported that the film won't be able to release before March or April 2018, that too only if it gets CBFC clearance in the first go.

A CBFC official reportedly said that the Board cannot certify it before the second week of January. There are over 40 feature films in several languages pending for clearance before Padmavati.

ReasonsAn ill-fated film mired in controversies

Violent nationwide protests and threats against Padmavati, and questions over the legitimacy of its content aren't the only reasons for its delayed release.

The film's makers are also responsible. They submitted an incomplete certification application to the CBFC with an ambiguous disclaimer, days ahead of the film's December 1 release. The Board dutifully rejected its application, further complicating an already volatile situation.