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India
20 Feb 2018

HRD wants 'proof' of students watching 'Pariksha Par Charcha'

HRD wants photos/videos of students watching Modi's program

The HRD Ministry reportedly wants photo or video proof from schools across the country that students watched the telecast of PM Narendra Modi's 'Pariksha Par Charcha.'

The deadline to submit necessary documents was yesterday.

However, a senior official explained schools had been asked for "a routine feedback where no mandatory clause was given."

"No evidence was sought," the official insisted.

In context

HRD wants photos/videos of students watching Modi's program
'Pariksha Par charcha': Modi advises students on dealing with stress

Discussion

'Pariksha Par charcha': Modi advises students on dealing with stress

On February 16, Modi interacted with students at a session called 'Pariksha Par charcha' at Delhi's Talkatora Stadium, days ahead of board exams.

While thousands were in attendance, crores joined in from across the country through video-conference.

Some got the chance to directly ask him questions on the importance of self-confidence, peer pressure, adequate rest, societal expectations, teacher-student bond and IQ-EQ balance.

Instructions

Officials asked to furnish details about students who viewed telecast

HRD reportedly issued circulars to states to ask all schools, irrespective of their board, to provide details of students who had watched the program.

District officials were given forms seeking information like the total number of schools, enrolment figures, schools where students viewed the telecast, and number of students who viewed it.

Incidentally, UP had asked madrassas to videograph their Independence Day 2017 celebrations.

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Officials, schools, parents baffled by "bizarre" circular

Reax

Officials, schools, parents baffled by "bizarre" circular

The order was met with disbelief. Officials at MP's Directorate of Public Instructions were confused how to calculate the exact number of students who had watched it on YouTube.

"While it's good to advise children on stress, it seems more like propaganda to collect evidence," a parent complained.

Educationist SS Rajagopalan called it "slavish," asking: "Why's the state so submissive to the Center?"

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