Want to share with your friends too?

India
17 Jan 2019

25% Class-4 students in rural India can't read Class-2 books

ASER: Dismal state of education in rural India

The Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2018 has shed light on the sorry state of education in rural India, again. It is alarming, to say the least.

The report concluded that one in four Class 4 students can't read Class 2 textbooks and one in two Class 8 students can't solve basic division problems.

The survey was conducted by NGO Pratham.

In context

ASER: Dismal state of education in rural India
53% of Class 8 students can't solve basic math problems

Data

53% of Class 8 students can't solve basic math problems

The survey was conducted across 596 rural districts and took into account 3.5 lakh households and 546,527 children aged between three and 16, reports HT.

The ASER data underlines that only 73% of Class 8 students in rural India can read Class 2 books and 56% can't solve basic math problems.

In India, studying till Class 8 is compulsory for all.

Improvements

States like Uttar Pradesh, Odisha and Chhattisgarh have performed well

There have been few improvements too. For example, in 2013, 21.6% of Class 3 students were able to read Class 2 books. In 2018, the number crawled to 27.2%.

In 2016, 47.9% of Class 5 students could read Class 2 books. In 2018, this number was 50.3%.

Meanwhile, some states namely, Himachal Pradesh, UP, Odisha, Chhattisgarh, Karnataka, Kerala, Arunachal Pradesh, and Mizoram, showed improvement.

Love India news?

Stay updated with the latest happenings.

Notify Me

For the first time, less than 3% students weren't enrolled

Good news

For the first time, less than 3% students weren't enrolled

Another figure worth celebrating is that for the first time, the proportion of children not enrolled in school dipped. It stood at 2.8% in 2018.

In 2006, 10.3% of girls between 11-14 dropped out of school. This number fell to 4.1%.

In 2008, 20% of girls aged between 15-16 weren't enrolled in schools. In 2018, 13.5% weren't enrolled.

Schemes of Centre and States helped keep girls in schools

The improvement in girls' education, albeit minimal, is due to a number of schemes introduced by the Centre and states, and attention given to infrastructure. To keep girls in school, some states provide bicycles. The number of serviceable toilets also doubled from 2010 to 2018.

Details

Not much change in enrollment in private schools

The data also highlighted that the number of students enrolled in private schools hasn't changed much. While in 2016, 30.6% of children enrolled in private schools it was just 30.9% in 2018.

This implies the number of enrollment in government schools has risen.

Educationist Mohd Miyan, a former member of UGC, said the absence of private schools in rural India could be a reason.

Ask NewsBytes
User Image

Most asked questions

Who conducted the survey?

How many districts were considered for the survey?

How many children in rural India aren't enrolled in schools?

Are schemes of the government helping in any way?

More questions

Who conducted the survey?

Asked on 17-01-2019 by Hemant Rodrigues

Answered by NewsBytes

The survey was conducted by NGO Pratham.

How many districts were considered for the survey?

Asked on 17-01-2019 by Aarav Sarin

Answered by NewsBytes

The survey took into account 596 rural districts.

How many children in rural India aren't enrolled in schools?

Asked on 17-01-2019 by Muhammad Subramanium

Answered by NewsBytes

Nearly 2.8% of children aren't enrolled in schools.

Are schemes of the government helping in any way?

Asked on 17-01-2019 by Saanvi Balasubramanium

Answered by NewsBytes

Yes, government schemes like building toilets and providing bicycles is helping keep girls in schools.

Next Timeline