Two leading clean energy projects are in India

05 Jan 2017 | By Shiladitya Ray

India's resolve in battling climate change has manifested in two of the world's leading clean energy projects.

Both of these projects, a CO2 converting plant and the world's largest solar power plant, are located in Tamil Nadu.

With PM Narendra Modi offering subsidies for a plan to power 60 million homes by solar power by 2022, India fighting the climate change.

In context: India leads the charge against climate change

05 Jan 2017Two leading clean energy projects are in India

Former shell chairman praises CO2 capture

"We have to do everything we can to reduce the harmful effects of burning fossil fuels and it is great news that more ways are being found of turning at least some of the CO2 into useful products," said Lord Oxburgh, former Shell chairman.
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Plant in Tuticorin develops carbon capture and utilization technique

Carbon capturePlant in Tuticorin develops carbon capture and utilization technique

An industrial plant located in the port city of Tuticorin in Tamil Nadu has successfully developed a carbon capture and utilization (CCU) technique, and is currently running at almost zero emissions.

The $3.6 million plant captures CO2 from a coal boiler using a new patented chemical and uses the CO2 as an ingredient in the manufacture of baking soda and several other compounds.

Never thought of saving the planet, says owner

"I am a businessman. I never thought about saving the planet. I needed a reliable stream of CO2, and this was the best way of getting it," said Ramachandran Gopalan, the owner of the Tuticorin chemicals plant.

Solar powerThe Kamuthi solar power plant

Kamuthi, located 90 km outside Madurai, Tamil Nadu, is the home to the world's largest solar power plant.

The $679 million project spans a 10 km area and has a capacity of 648 MW, enough to power 150,000 homes.

The plant was constructed in eight months - faster than California's Topaz Solar Power Plant, the former leader in solar power plants.