India

Ryan International School principal booked for negligence over child's death

14 May 2017 | By Gaurav Jeyaraman
School principal charged over student's death

Over a year after 6-year old Divyansh Kakrora died after drowning in the water tank of Ryan International School in Vasant Kunj, police have booked the school authorities for negligence.

The school administrator, principal and Kakrora's class teacher have been booked for multiple acts of negligence that endangered children's lives.

The police have ruled out foul play in the case.

In context: School principal charged over student's death

January 2016Delhi student drowns in school tank

A class-I student at Ryan International, Divyansh Kakrora, died after falling in a water harvesting tank situated in the school premises.

Divyansh's parents, both paramedics at AIIMS, accused the school for negligence and for withholding the news from them for too long.

The parents called for a CBI probe, alleging foul play.

The police were investigating the case.

Arrests5 arrested for negligence in Divyansh Kakrora's death

The parents alleged that the water storage room where Divyansh was found dead was neither manned nor locked and the school had not alerted them of the accident.

5 people, including the principal, 1 teacher and 3 non-teaching staff members of south Delhi's Ryan International School were arrested by the Delhi Police.

A case of negligence was registered and a probe begun.

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14 May 2017Ryan International School principal booked for negligence over child's death

Who have been booked?

The school administrator, Francis Thomas has been cited as an accused in the case, while the principal Sandhya Sabu, and class teacher Meenakshi Kapoor have been named co-accused in the case.
What did the police probe reveal?

DetailsWhat did the police probe reveal?

Police said they had examined CCTV footage showing Kakrora playing with his friends minutes before going toward the school tank.

They said there was no CCTV at the tank, but balls, books and pens found in the tank showed that children in the school often accessed the tank area.

They said the school was "habitually negligent" with regards to the tank.