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Sports
13 Mar 2019

Is MCC's proposed shot clock for Tests a good idea?

MCC proposes shot clock for Test cricket

Ever since the arrival of T20s, the longer version of the game has taken a hit in terms of popularity.

The MCC is working hard to implement new ideas to make Test cricket as interesting as T20s.

In the same light, a new proposal has been put ahead to introduce shot clocks that would speed up the gameplay.

Let us analyze this proposal.

In context

MCC proposes shot clock for Test cricket
What would be the shot clock's role?

Role

What would be the shot clock's role?

As the name suggests, the shot clock would be responsible to maintain the time between the two shots played by the batsmen.

In case, a shot has not been played by the time the clock strikes zero, the fielding team would receive a warning, while further violations would lead to five penalty runs being awarded to the batting side.

Three types of shot clock

A statement by MCC says, "A timer, to be shown on the scoreboard, to count down from 45 seconds from the call of 'Over'. (This would be increased to 60 seconds for a new batsman on strike and 80 seconds for a change of bowler)."

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Concept

How did the concept come in?

While this would be the first time in cricket, the shot clock has been used before in other sports.

Notably, it is common in American sports including basketball.

Recently, it is also being used in tennis as 'serve clock', where the time from the last point won to the next serve is calculated to speed up the pace of the game.

How would this affect team's strategy?

Startegies

How would this affect team's strategy?

While it sounds interesting to quite a few, especially the batting side, we analyze how would it affect the bowling side.

With the shot clock in place, the bowling side won't have much time to think about their next move or fielding placement.

Further, they would have to think their strategy within 40 seconds, to have five seconds in hand to complete the delivery.

Other changes

Proposals for changes in DRS and free hit also suggested

Apart from the shot clock, two more changes have been proposed.

During DRS, the standard procedure would be cut short once the TV production team is aware that there is conclusive evidence.

Moreover, the concept of the free hit for no balls in Tests has also been suggested to make the format interesting as well as a bit batsman friendly.

Standard ball to be used for Test cricket?

Standard ball

Standard ball to be used for Test cricket?

The MCC World Committee has also suggested that standard balls be used for Test cricket.

Currently, three different balls are being used in Tests, with Dukes in England and Windies, SG in India and Kookaburra everywhere else.

Chairman Mike Gatting has suggested that Dukes balls could also be trailed in Asia, following India's complaint of the quality of SG balls, recently.

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Most asked questions

Will the shot clock be used only in Tests ot ODIs and T20Is as well?

How many DRS challenges are allowed in Tests and limited-overs?

Can a batsman be dismissed of Free Hit?

How many fielders can a side place at the boundary in Test cricket?

More questions

Will the shot clock be used only in Tests ot ODIs and T20Is as well?

Asked 2019-03-13 18:49:19 by Saanvi Saxena

Answered by NewsBytes

As of now, the shot clock concept has only been proposed for Test cricket.

How many DRS challenges are allowed in Tests and limited-overs?

Asked 2019-03-13 18:49:19 by Anika Malhotra

Answered by NewsBytes

DRS challenge in Tests is limited to two per side per innings (batting & bowling), while in limited0vers, it is restricted to just one.

Can a batsman be dismissed of Free Hit?

Asked 2019-03-13 18:49:19 by Tejas Malhotra

Answered by NewsBytes

No, a batsman cannot be dismissed off a Free Hit, unless he is run out.

How many fielders can a side place at the boundary in Test cricket?

Asked 2019-03-13 18:49:19 by Aradhya Venkatesan

Answered by NewsBytes

There is no fielder's limit in Test cricket. A side can place all their men at the boundary at the same time.

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