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World
31 Jan 2018

US woman wants "emotional support" peacock to fly with her

United Airlines said no to a peacock onboard

A passenger at US' Newark airport had a bizarre request: she wanted her "emotional support" peacock to fly with her.

She even claimed to have a second ticket for the bird.

But United Airlines, on which she was to fly, remained adamant. The bird didn't meet guidelines for several reasons, it said, "including its weight and size."

Needless to say, the peacock couldn't fly.

In context

United Airlines said no to a peacock onboard
Many are unhappy with United's decision

Details

Many are unhappy with United's decision

United said they had informed the unidentified passenger thrice before she came to the airport that the bird wouldn't be able to fly.

They said they're reevaluating their "support animal" policies.

However, not everyone agreed with the airline's decision.

"I'll take the peacock over the 5+ dogs that have attacked my coworkers just this past holiday season," a purported airline staffer commented.

Delta

Animals bite, urinate, defecate and attack others, airlines complain

This comes right after Delta Airlines cracked down on emotional support and service animals.

Now those flying with Delta have to produce a veterinarian health form, immunization records and proof of animal training.

It has refused to allow exotic animals on board too.

The decision came after a reported 84% increase in animal misbehavior like urinating, defecating, biting and attacks on flights.

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But clamor for withdrawal of such new policies

Protest

But clamor for withdrawal of such new policies

However, those who need service animals have protested the move, saying the entire community is being punished because of a few lawbreakers.

"During an emergency travel, I need to travel with my dog...When I'm in my wheelchair I need help," explained Joseph Worley, a former Navyman who lost his leg in war.

The Department of Transportation is now reviewing the airline's new policy.

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