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Japanese youth 'not having sex'

06 Jul 2017 | By Abheet Sethi
Japanese youth are averse to having sex

Japanese society is renowned for its sexual culture, which is open to catering any fetish or fantasy.

Japan for one, gave birth to the concept of love hotels.

Yet, a new study has revealed that 43% of Japanese people aged 18-34 years, have never had sex. Around 64% claim they aren't in any relationships.

The report comes amid concerns of Japan's declining population.

In context: Japanese youth are averse to having sex

06 Jul 2017Japanese youth 'not having sex'

DetailsOnline porn, virtual-reality "girlfriends" replacing real relationships

Japanese youth appear to have lost interest in having conventional relationships and dating. Others can't be bothered about having sex.

"Both men and women say to me they don't see the point of love. They don't believe it can lead anywhere," said sex counsellor Ai Aoyama. "Relationships have become too hard."

Some take to online porn, virtual-reality "girlfriends" or anime cartoons for gratification.

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Why is Japanese youth not having sex?

ReasonsWhy is Japanese youth not having sex?

Nancy Snow, a professor at the Kyoto University of Foreign Studies, believes changing socio-economic norms are responsible for fewer relationships between men and women.

She said Japan's working women make more money and are more successful than before, making men less confident.

Working women are no longer as favourably disposed to marriage as before because societal norms dictate they stop working after having children.

Japanese man says low self-confidence stops him from entering relationship

26-year-old Ano Matsui says he doesn't have self-confidence and isn't involved in sexual relationships. He says: "There are a lot of men like me who find women scary. We are afraid of being rejected. So we spent time doing hobbies like animation."

ExplainedWhy Japanese government fears "celibacy syndrome"

The "celibacy syndrome" sweeping Japanese youth has left the Japanese worried as the country's population is declining.

According to Japan's latest census forecasts, the population would fall from 127 million in 2012 to 87 million by 2060.

A drop in Japan's working population would lower potential growth and shrink the country's GDP, causing the country to run into labour and human resource shortages.